SnapManager for SQL Sizing Case Study


This SnapManager for SQL case study was conducted for a real world client. Anything in this study that could identify the client has been removed from the article to protect their business. I wanted to take this opportunity to document the procedures and explanations for sizing such an environment.

This particular implementation involved a three node SQL Server 2012 AlwaysOn Availability Group running on Server 2008R2 physical servers. The databases are new and haven’t been populated with data, yet, so the sizing had to take these “known unknowns” into account. SnapManager for SQL 6.0 and SnapDrive for Windows 6.5 were used. The NetApp system includes a FAS3220 in an HA pair running Data ONTAP 8.1.2 7-mode.

Typical best practices were used such as using volume autogrow, letting SnapManager take care of Snapshot deletions, etc. I don’t address thin provisioning, deduplication, or space reservations in this document beyond saying that Fractional Reserve is kept at its default 0% and SnapReserve is changed to 0%. I suggested the LUNs and volumes be thinly provisioned because the client has a trained and dedicated NetApp Administrator on staff with the tools and alerts necessary to manage aggregate capacity properly. The storage deployment is a new, mid-size deployment and capacity is already at a premium. Thin provisioning now, monitoring, and growing or shrinking volumes and LUNs as actual growth is observed was advised so as not to waste space. Deduplication was used on the database volumes and CIFS shares – not the transaction logs, SnapInfo, TempDB, or System Databases.

A logical diagram of a SQL Server replication scheme is show below. There is an OLTP database that is relatively large compared to the many smaller databases that comprise the Data Warehouse (DW). Each Primary Replica will be at Site A hosted, under normal conditions, on separate nodes. These nodes will then synchronously replicate within the same site to the other node. Asynchronous replication will happen across sites to Site B and a third node.

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